Jump up ^ John Reid Blackwell (March 10, 2011). “SnagAJob gets $27 million investment – Richmond Times Dispatch: Metro-Richmond’s Latest Business & Economic News”. .timesdispatch.com. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
#Hiring an Administrative Assistant? We have the #interview questions and answers to guide you through the process. http://indeedhi.re/2DlmSBF  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #Recruiters #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/823pt8YXt8
Granted, there are much scarier forecasts out there, like that University of Oxford study. But on closer examination, those predictions tend to assume that if a job can be automated, it will be fully automated soon—which overestimates both the pace and the completeness of how automation actually gets adopted in the wild. History suggests that the process is much more uneven than that. The ATM, for example, is a textbook example of a machine that was designed to replace human labor. First introduced around 1970, ATMs hit widespread adoption in the late 1990s. Today, there are more than 400,000 ATMs in the US. But, as economist James Bessen has shown, the number of bank tellers actually rose between 2000 and 2010. That’s because even though the average number of tellers per branch fell, ATMs made it cheaper to open branches, so banks opened more of them. True, the Department of Labor does now predict that the number of tellers will decline by 8 percent over the next decade. But that’s 8 percent—not 50 percent. And it’s 45 years after the robot that was supposed to replace them made its debut. (Taking a wider view, Bessen found that of the 271 occupations listed on the 1950 census only one—elevator operator—had been rendered obsolete by automation by 2010.)
289001BR Banking Advisor Sr (MLO) Asset Management Group OH – Akron Specialist II At PNC, our people are our greatest differentiator and competitive advantage in the markets we serve. We are all united in delivering the best experience for our…
Perhaps the most damning piece of evidence, according to Brynjolfsson, is a chart that only an economist could love. In economics, productivity—the amount of economic value created for a given unit of input, such as an hour of labor—is a crucial indicator of growth and wealth creation. It is a measure of progress. On the chart Brynjolfsson likes to show, separate lines represent productivity and total employment in the United States. For years after World War II, the two lines closely tracked each other, with increases in jobs corresponding to increases in productivity. The pattern is clear: as businesses generated more value from their workers, the country as a whole became richer, which fueled more economic activity and created even more jobs. Then, beginning in 2000, the lines diverge; productivity continues to rise robustly, but employment suddenly wilts. By 2011, a significant gap appears between the two lines, showing economic growth with no parallel increase in job creation. Brynjolfsson and McAfee call it the “great decoupling.” And Brynjolfsson says he is confident that technology is behind both the healthy growth in productivity and the weak growth in jobs.
Even our fears about automation and computerization aren’t new; they closely echo the anxieties of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Observers then too were convinced that automation would lead to permanent unemployment. The Ad Hoc Committee on the Triple Revolution—a group of scientists and thinkers concerned about the impact of what was then called cybernation—argued that “the capability of machines is rising more rapidly than the capacity of many human beings to keep pace.” Cybernation “has broken the link between jobs and income, exiling from the economy an ever-­widening pool of men and women,” wrote W. H. Ferry, of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, in 1965. Change “cybernation” to “automation” or “AI,” and all that could have been written today.
Job Description NOW HIRING!!! START MONDAY!!!!!SHARE!!!!! We are currently looking for professional individuals to be a part of our family. If you like sales, marketing, customer service or strive to own a business, this position is for you. All…
Thinking of hiring, but not sure where to start? Utilize Indeed’s hiring resources and get started making a hire today! http://indeedhi.re/2Gi0qfQ  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #HR #Employerspic.twitter.com/rwCxmsCRDL
New technologies are “encroaching into human skills in a way that is completely unprecedented,” McAfee says, and many middle-class jobs are right in the bull’s-eye; even relatively high-skill work in education, medicine, and law is affected. “The middle seems to be going away,” he adds. “The top and bottom are clearly getting farther apart.” While technology might be only one factor, says McAfee, it has been an “underappreciated” one, and it is likely to become increasingly significant.
How to find a job video series: Snagajob offers job search advice on how to find a job. Topics include: “Why aren’t I hearing back from employers?”, “How do I get a job with no experience?” and “How do I stand out in my job search?”
Unmute @indeed Mute @indeed Follow Follow @indeed Following Following @indeed Unfollow Unfollow @indeed Blocked Blocked @indeed Unblock Unblock @indeed Pending Pending follow request from @indeed Cancel Cancel your follow request to @indeed
David Autor, an economist at MIT who has extensively studied the connections between jobs and technology, also doubts that technology could account for such an abrupt change in total employment. “There was a great sag in employment beginning in 2000. Something did change,” he says. “But no one knows the cause.” Moreover, he doubts that productivity has, in fact, risen robustly in the United States in the past decade (economists can disagree about that statistic because there are different ways of measuring and weighing economic inputs and outputs). If he’s right, it raises the possibility that poor job growth could be simply a result of a sluggish economy. The sudden slowdown in job creation “is a big puzzle,” he says, “but there’s not a lot of evidence it’s linked to computers.”
Job Description Position Benefits – Competitive compensation packages – Steady Weekly Base with Performance Bonuses additional – Advancement options available – Uncapped bonuses & incentive plans – Comprehensive Training Full time sales account manager position available! We are currently accepting applications for a sales account managers to work as part of our sales team. Sales account managers will receive training to ensure they have all the skills and knowledge that they require to be successful in this high energy sales industry. We are seeking candidates that are outgoing, personable &…
Now imagine you’re an economist back on the ground, and a panic­stricken software engineer is warning that his creations are about to plow everyone straight into a world without work. Just as surely, there are a couple of statistical instruments you know to consult right away to see if this prediction checks out. If automation were, in fact, transforming the US economy, two things would be true: Aggregate productivity would be rising sharply, and jobs would be harder to come by than in the past.
Brynjolfsson himself says he’s not ready to conclude that economic progress and employment have diverged for good. “I don’t know whether we can recover, but I hope we can,” he says. But that, he suggests, will depend on recognizing the problem and taking steps such as investing more in the training and education of workers.
What is the difference between a #JobBoard and a #JobSearch Engine? Learn the differences and why Indeed is a good fit for #employers! http://indeedhi.re/2tH9d8s  #RecruitingTips #RecruitmentAgency #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/2hCdq4dHzn
Noma Bar (Illustration); Data from Bureau of Labor Statistics (Productivity, Output, GDP Per Capita); International Federation of Robotics; CIA World Factbook (GDP by Sector); Bureau of Labor Statistics (Job Growth, Manufacturing Employment); D. Autor and D. Dorn, U.S. Census, American Community Survey, and Department of Labor (Change in Employment and Wages by Skill, Routine Jobs); Bureau of Labor Statistics (Productivity, Output, GDP Per Capita); International Federation of Robotics; CIA World Factbook (GDP by Sector)
As the editor of MIT Technology Review, I spend much of my time thinking about the types of stories and journalism that will be most valuable to our readers. What do curious, well-informed readers need to know about emerging technologies? As a… More writer, I am particularly interested these days in the intersection of chemistry, materials science, energy, manufacturing, and economics.
Over the past few years, it has become conventional wisdom that dramatic advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have put us on the path to a jobless future. We are living in the midst of a “second machine age,” to quote the title of the influential book by MIT researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, in which routine work of all kinds—in manufacturing, sales, bookkeeping, food prep—is being automated at a steady clip, and even complex analytical jobs will be superseded before long. A widely cited 2013 study by researchers at the University of Oxford, for instance, found that nearly half of all jobs in the US were at risk of being fully automated over the next 20 years. The endgame, we’re told, is inevitable: The robots are on the march, and human labor is in retreat.
Summary Creates a welcome environment for Customers. Sells soft drinks, packaged and/or bulk candies, popcorn, hot dogs, ice cream, coffee, and other food items to theatre patrons. Operates and cleans concession and/or restaurant equipment. Cleans,…
But are these new technologies really responsible for a decade of lackluster job growth? Many labor economists say the data are, at best, far from conclusive. Several other plausible explanations, including events related to global trade and the financial crises of the early and late 2000s, could account for the relative slowness of job creation since the turn of the century. “No one really knows,” says Richard Freeman, a labor economist at Harvard University. That’s because it’s very difficult to “extricate” the effects of technology from other macroeconomic effects, he says. But he’s skeptical that technology would change a wide range of business sectors fast enough to explain recent job numbers.
Multi-Service Heavy Equipment dealership is in need of an experienced Territory Sales Manager to effectively cover 14 county territory and direct the efforts of its Sales force. Qualified Territory Sales Manager should possess an energetic customer first based approach. Looking for a positive leader that has rental and sales experience and Multi-Location Heavy construction equipment dealership responsibility. The Sales Manager must have extensive Heavy Equipment Industry experience and product try product knowledge (Volvo, LeeBoy/Rosco, Sandvik Mining, Heavy Construction and Material handling…
Whether you are preparing to interview a candidate or applying for a job, review our list of top #Nurse interview questions and answers. http://indeedhi.re/2FDIF9y  #InterviewTips #HiringTips #Employerspic.twitter.com/OITPeOwxKk

What’s more, even if today’s digital technologies are holding down job creation, history suggests that it is most likely a temporary, albeit painful, shock; as workers adjust their skills and entrepreneurs create opportunities based on the new technologies, the number of jobs will rebound. That, at least, has always been the pattern. The question, then, is whether today’s computing technologies will be different, creating long-term involuntary unemployment.
Corporate America, for its part, certainly doesn’t seem to believe in the jobless future. If the rewards of automation were as immense as predicted, companies would be pouring money into new technology. But they’re not. Investments in software and IT grew more slowly over the past decade than the previous one. And capital investment, according to Mishel and Bivens, has grown more slowly since 2002 than in any other postwar period. That’s exactly the opposite of what you’d expect in a rapidly automating world. As for gadgets like Pepper, total spending on all robotics in the US was just $11.3 billion last year. That’s about a sixth of what Americans spend every year on their pets.
Alas, the future this study envisions seems to be very far off. To be sure, the fact that fears about automation have been proved false in the past doesn’t mean they will continue to be so in the future, and all of those long-foretold positive feedback loops exponential growth may abruptly kick in someday. But it isn’t easy to see how we’ll get there from here anytime soon, given how little companies are investing in new technology and how slowly the economy is growing. In that sense, the problem we’re facing isn’t that the robots are coming. It’s that they aren’t.
Getting a first job is an important rite of passage in many cultures. The youth may start by doing household work, odd jobs, or working for a family business. In many countries, school children get summer jobs during the longer summer vacation. Students enrolled in higher education can apply for internships or coops to further enhance the probability of securing an entry level job upon graduation.
To be sure, Autor says, computer technologies are changing the types of jobs available, and those changes “are not always for the good.” At least since the 1980s, he says, computers have increasingly taken over such tasks as bookkeeping, clerical work, and repetitive production jobs in manufacturing—all of which typically provided middle-class pay. At the same time, higher-paying jobs requiring creativity and problem-solving skills, often aided by computers, have proliferated. So have low-skill jobs: demand has increased for restaurant workers, janitors, home health aides, and others doing service work that is nearly impossible to automate. The result, says Autor, has been a “polarization” of the workforce and a “hollowing out” of the middle class—something that has been happening in numerous industrialized countries for the last several decades. But “that is very different from saying technology is affecting the total number of jobs,” he adds. “Jobs can change a lot without there being huge changes in employment rates.”
One of the friendlier, more flexible robots meant to work with humans is Rethink’s Baxter. The creation of Rodney Brooks, the company’s founder, Baxter needs minimal training to perform simple tasks like picking up objects and moving them to a box. It’s meant for use in relatively small manufacturing facilities where conventional industrial robots would cost too much and pose too much danger to workers. The idea, says Brooks, is to have the robots take care of dull, repetitive jobs that no one wants to do.
Job Description Sonder Acquisitions, Inc. is currently hiring Full-Time candidates to join our team as members of our dedicated team of retail sales associates. We are growing rapidly throughout the greater Youngstown area. We need candidates who…
Posting your job on indeed is an easy way to make your job visible to millions of users! Learn how easy and quick it actually is. http://indeedhi.re/2HpZky0  #Employers #Recruiters #Recruiting #RecruitmentTipspic.twitter.com/290sQ53ZDn
Indeed’s data science team crunched the numbers to give us the best cities for job seekers to live in, based on job market favorability, average salary, and employers’ scores in work-life balance and job security/advancement. Here are the results:https://indeedhi.re/2Hx4PvW 
McAfee points to both retail and transportation as areas where automation is likely to have a major impact. Yet even in those industries, the job-loss numbers are less scary than many headlines suggest. Goldman Sachs just released a report predicting that autonomous cars could ultimately eat away 300,000 driving jobs a year. But that won’t happen, the firm argues, for another 25 years, which is more than enough time for the economy to adapt. A recent study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, meanwhile, predicts that 9 percent of jobs across 21 different countries are under serious threat from automation. That’s a significant number, but not an apocalyptic one.
And that’s not all we’ve eradicated. We think, because we keep both hirer and candidate involved, it’s only fair that they should earn something for it. So they do. Instead of paying the industry average 20% fee for hiring an candidate, our hirer pays just 6%. And guess where 5 of those 6% go? To the candidate. That’s right. 5% of their annual salary for landing the job. If that’s not reason enough to apply for a job, we don’t know what is…
No proof that the app works. The layout is nice. Easy to use but i havent herd from a single employer. Not even an email saying that I didnt make the cut. Nothing at all. So i am concerned that the app just doesn’t work. Ive had the app for 4 months used it every day and have yet to even hear from a…
Today, technology has progressed to the point where recruitment agencies are no longer needed. Using the power of the Blockchain, we’ve found a way to bring both employer and candidate together, in a way that suits both parties. The employer gets a tech-savvy, well-matched candidate for less. The applicant gets a forward-thinking employer and a 5% bonus just for landing the role. We get the knowledge that, next time you’re hiring, you’ll want to do so through us. Everybody wins.
We believe people are the heart of great businesses. Snag is all about helping you get the work you want, whether that’s finding a new hourly job or picking up an extra shift or two. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2pSIWQc Show less
Job Description Brand Ambassador – Entry Level / Paid Training *College Grads and Interns Welcome to apply! We are rapidly expanding and in need of FUN and OUTGOING candidates to fill an Entry Level position. Brand Ambassadors will be responsible…
Job Description We are a renowned leader in retail sales and marketing. We currently have openings, at the entry level, for Sales Representatives. We are looking for outgoing and self-motivated people who are comfortable interacting with consumers…
Moonlighting is the practice of holding an additional job or jobs, often at night, in addition to one’s main job, usually to earn extra income. A person who moonlights may have little time left for sleep or leisure activities.
Despite the labor-saving potential of the robots, Mick Mountz, Kiva’s founder and CEO, says he doubts the machines have put many people out of work or will do so in the future. For one thing, he says, most of Kiva’s customers are e-commerce retailers, some of them growing so rapidly they can’t hire people fast enough. By making distribution operations cheaper and more efficient, the robotic technology has helped many of these retailers survive and even expand. Before founding Kiva, Mountz worked at Webvan, an online grocery delivery company that was one of the 1990s dot-com era’s most infamous flameouts. He likes to show the numbers demonstrating that Webvan was doomed from the start; a $100 order cost the company $120 to ship. Mountz’s point is clear: something as mundane as the cost of materials handling can consign a new business to an early death. Automation can solve that problem.
Job Description Looking to take a step toward a successful career? Determined to show your value within a professional business setting? Sonder Acquisitions Inc is seeking dedicated individuals interested in a customer service based approach to…
We’ve found that job descriptions between 700 and 1,100 words see an average 24% increase in apply rate. http://indeedhi.re/2IiFBS6  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/NJk4LwCty4
McAfee, associate director of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the Sloan School of Management, speaks rapidly and with a certain awe as he describes advances such as Google’s driverless car. Still, despite his obvious enthusiasm for the technologies, he doesn’t see the recently vanished jobs coming back. The pressure on employment and the resulting inequality will only get worse, he suggests, as digital technologies—fueled with “enough computing power, data, and geeks”—continue their exponential advances over the next several decades. “I would like to be wrong,” he says, “but when all these science-fiction technologies are deployed, what will we need all the people for?”
Cast a wide net with our network of 90 million job seekers. Our algorithms will find employees to hire and notify the best ones to apply. We also help you refine your search so you can easily find that needle in a haystack.
[otp_overlay]