Job Description Hospitality / Food Industry / Retail / Restaurant – Full Time We are looking for candidates with experience in the retail – hospitality and restaurant / food service industry for the full time account manager position. Do you strive…
Job Description Sonder Acquisitions, Inc. is currently hiring Full-Time candidates to join our team as members of our dedicated team of retail sales associates. We are growing rapidly throughout the greater Youngstown area. We need candidates who…
Getting a first job is an important rite of passage in many cultures. The youth may start by doing household work, odd jobs, or working for a family business. In many countries, school children get summer jobs during the longer summer vacation. Students enrolled in higher education can apply for internships or coops to further enhance the probability of securing an entry level job upon graduation.
Job Description Looking to take a step toward a successful career? Determined to show your value within a professional business setting? Sonder Acquisitions Inc is seeking dedicated individuals interested in a customer service based approach to…
One of the friendlier, more flexible robots meant to work with humans is Rethink’s Baxter. The creation of Rodney Brooks, the company’s founder, Baxter needs minimal training to perform simple tasks like picking up objects and moving them to a box. It’s meant for use in relatively small manufacturing facilities where conventional industrial robots would cost too much and pose too much danger to workers. The idea, says Brooks, is to have the robots take care of dull, repetitive jobs that no one wants to do.
To be sure, Autor says, computer technologies are changing the types of jobs available, and those changes “are not always for the good.” At least since the 1980s, he says, computers have increasingly taken over such tasks as bookkeeping, clerical work, and repetitive production jobs in manufacturing—all of which typically provided middle-class pay. At the same time, higher-paying jobs requiring creativity and problem-solving skills, often aided by computers, have proliferated. So have low-skill jobs: demand has increased for restaurant workers, janitors, home health aides, and others doing service work that is nearly impossible to automate. The result, says Autor, has been a “polarization” of the workforce and a “hollowing out” of the middle class—something that has been happening in numerous industrialized countries for the last several decades. But “that is very different from saying technology is affecting the total number of jobs,” he adds. “Jobs can change a lot without there being huge changes in employment rates.”
Cast a wide net with our network of 90 million job seekers. Our algorithms will find employees to hire and notify the best ones to apply. We also help you refine your search so you can easily find that needle in a haystack.
The machines created at Kiva and Rethink have been cleverly designed and built to work with people, taking over the tasks that the humans often don’t want to do or aren’t especially good at. They are specifically designed to enhance these workers’ productivity. And it’s hard to see how even these increasingly sophisticated robots will replace humans in most manufacturing and industrial jobs anytime soon. But clerical and some professional jobs could be more vulnerable. That’s because the marriage of artificial intelligence and big data is beginning to give machines a more humanlike ability to reason and to solve many new types of problems.
According to a new report released Wednesday, cryptocurrency-related searches on the site climbed from June through mid-December of 2017, peaking at 39 searches per million for the term “bitcoin” and 46 searches per million for the term “cryptocurrency.”
It’s hard not to instantly like Baxter, in part because it seems so eager to please. The “eyebrows” on its display rise quizzically when it’s puzzled; its arms submissively and gently retreat when bumped. Asked about the claim that such advanced industrial robots could eliminate jobs, Brooks answers simply that he doesn’t see it that way. Robots, he says, can be to factory workers as electric drills are to construction workers: “It makes them more productive and efficient, but it doesn’t take jobs.”
But are these new technologies really responsible for a decade of lackluster job growth? Many labor economists say the data are, at best, far from conclusive. Several other plausible explanations, including events related to global trade and the financial crises of the early and late 2000s, could account for the relative slowness of job creation since the turn of the century. “No one really knows,” says Richard Freeman, a labor economist at Harvard University. That’s because it’s very difficult to “extricate” the effects of technology from other macroeconomic effects, he says. But he’s skeptical that technology would change a wide range of business sectors fast enough to explain recent job numbers.
In 2011, Snagajob was named the best small business to work for by the Great Place to Work Institute.[6][7][8] Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell visited Snagajob headquarters the day of the announcement to offer his congratulations.[9]
Job Description We are a renowned leader in retail sales and marketing. We currently have openings, at the entry level, for Sales Representatives. We are looking for outgoing and self-motivated people who are comfortable interacting with consumers…
Despite the labor-saving potential of the robots, Mick Mountz, Kiva’s founder and CEO, says he doubts the machines have put many people out of work or will do so in the future. For one thing, he says, most of Kiva’s customers are e-commerce retailers, some of them growing so rapidly they can’t hire people fast enough. By making distribution operations cheaper and more efficient, the robotic technology has helped many of these retailers survive and even expand. Before founding Kiva, Mountz worked at Webvan, an online grocery delivery company that was one of the 1990s dot-com era’s most infamous flameouts. He likes to show the numbers demonstrating that Webvan was doomed from the start; a $100 order cost the company $120 to ship. Mountz’s point is clear: something as mundane as the cost of materials handling can consign a new business to an early death. Automation can solve that problem.
With all this positive feedback, it’s easy to see how our employees love their jobs. Want to learn more about our exciting global culture #insideindeed? Follow this link to read the full stats from Great Place to Work: http://glassdoor.com/slink.htm?key=vQDIt
However, Indeed reports that interest in blockchain-related roles has endured, with the search term garnering 47 searches per million at the time of the report – only slightly lower than during its February high.
Join Accenture and help transform top organizations and communities around the world. The sheer scale of our capabilities and client engagements and the way we collaborate, operate and deliver value provides an unparalleled opportunity to grow and advance. Choose Accenture, and make delivering innovative work part of your extraordinary career. Accenture Operations delivers continuous, rapid fire innovation and new business capabilities that meet and redefinethe needs of the digital era. Youll help our clientsincluding 94 of the Fortune 100 and governments around the worldtransform their…
Now, it’s possible that some of the productivity slowdown is the result of humans shifting out of factories into service jobs (which have historically been less productive than factory jobs). But even productivity growth in manufacturing, where automation and robotics have been well-established for decades, has been especially paltry of late. “I’m sure there are factories here and there where automation is making a difference,” says Dean Baker, an economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research. “But you can’t see it in the aggregate numbers.”
Thinking of hiring, but not sure where to start? Utilize Indeed’s hiring resources and get started making a hire today! http://indeedhi.re/2Gi0qfQ  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #HR #Employerspic.twitter.com/rwCxmsCRDL
It is this onslaught of digital processes, says Arthur, that primarily explains how productivity has grown without a significant increase in human labor. And, he says, “digital versions of human intelligence” are increasingly replacing even those jobs once thought to require people. “It will change every profession in ways we have barely seen yet,” he warns.
289001BR Banking Advisor Sr (MLO) Asset Management Group OH – Akron Specialist II At PNC, our people are our greatest differentiator and competitive advantage in the markets we serve. We are all united in delivering the best experience for our…
Join Accenture Consulting and youll work alongside fellow industry experts to lead transformational projects and define cutting edge solutions, solving our clients most complex issues. And because our clients span the full range of industries -…
Nevertheless, automation will indeed destroy many current jobs in the coming decades. As McAfee says, “When it comes to things like AI, machine learning, and self-driving cars and trucks, it’s still early. Their real impact won’t be felt for years yet.” What’s not obvious, though, is whether the impact of these innovations on the job market will be much bigger than the massive impact of technological improvements in the past. The outsourcing of work to machines is not, after all, new—it’s the dominant motif of the past 200 years of economic history, from the cotton gin to the washing machine to the car. Over and over again, as vast numbers of jobs have been destroyed, others have been created. And over and over, we’ve been terrible at envisioning what kinds of new jobs people would end up doing.

As the editor of MIT Technology Review, I spend much of my time thinking about the types of stories and journalism that will be most valuable to our readers. What do curious, well-informed readers need to know about emerging technologies? As a… More writer, I am particularly interested these days in the intersection of chemistry, materials science, energy, manufacturing, and economics.
If automation were truly remaking the job market, you’d also expect to see a lot of what economists call job churn as people move from company to company and industry to industry after their jobs have been destroyed. But we’re seeing the opposite of that. According to a recent paper by Robert Atkinson and John Wu of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, “Levels of occupational churn in the United States are now at historic lows.” The amount of churn since 2000—an era that saw the mainstreaming of the internet and the advent of AI—has been just 38 percent of the level of churn between 1950 and 2000. And this squares with the statistics on median US job tenure, which has lengthened, not shortened, since 2000. In other words, rather than a period of enormous disruption, this has been one of surprising stability for much of the American workforce. Median job tenure today is actually similar to what it was in the 1950s—the era we think of as the pinnacle of job stability.
Brynjolfsson himself says he’s not ready to conclude that economic progress and employment have diverged for good. “I don’t know whether we can recover, but I hope we can,” he says. But that, he suggests, will depend on recognizing the problem and taking steps such as investing more in the training and education of workers.
Join Accenture Consulting and youll work alongside fellow industry experts to lead transformational projects, and define cutting edge solutions, solving our clients most complex issues. And because our clients span the full range of industries – Including 94 of the Fortune 100 – youll have the opportunity to pursue your passion, hone your expertise and deepen your knowledge. As a consulting practitioner youll work with clients to improve the lives of consumers. Youll affect what people purchase, where they shop and what they drive, and have the opportunity to help create a more connected…
Granted, there are much scarier forecasts out there, like that University of Oxford study. But on closer examination, those predictions tend to assume that if a job can be automated, it will be fully automated soon—which overestimates both the pace and the completeness of how automation actually gets adopted in the wild. History suggests that the process is much more uneven than that. The ATM, for example, is a textbook example of a machine that was designed to replace human labor. First introduced around 1970, ATMs hit widespread adoption in the late 1990s. Today, there are more than 400,000 ATMs in the US. But, as economist James Bessen has shown, the number of bank tellers actually rose between 2000 and 2010. That’s because even though the average number of tellers per branch fell, ATMs made it cheaper to open branches, so banks opened more of them. True, the Department of Labor does now predict that the number of tellers will decline by 8 percent over the next decade. But that’s 8 percent—not 50 percent. And it’s 45 years after the robot that was supposed to replace them made its debut. (Taking a wider view, Bessen found that of the 271 occupations listed on the 1950 census only one—elevator operator—had been rendered obsolete by automation by 2010.)
Posting your job on indeed is an easy way to make your job visible to millions of users! Learn how easy and quick it actually is. http://indeedhi.re/2HpZky0  #Employers #Recruiters #Recruiting #RecruitmentTipspic.twitter.com/290sQ53ZDn
Search full time careers or part time jobs hiring in your area. Find jobs based on compatibility and personality, or find work with flexible hours for students and teens. Your next job is waiting on Snag.
“We were lucky and steadily rising productivity raised all boats for much of the 20th century,” he says. “Many people, especially economists, jumped to the conclusion that was just the way the world worked. I used to say that if we took care of productivity, everything else would take care of itself; it was the single most important economic statistic. But that’s no longer true.” He adds, “It’s one of the dirty secrets of economics: technology progress does grow the economy and create wealth, but there is no economic law that says everyone will benefit.” In other words, in the race against the machine, some are likely to win while many others lose.
Amsterdam Austin Bangalore Brussels Dublin Düsseldorf Hyderabad London New York Paris San Francisco San Mateo São Paulo Scottsdale Seattle Singapore Stamford Sydney Tokyo Toronto Zürich
Job Description We are seeking a qualified sales professional to join a winning team for the role of Insurance Agent with an active life insurance license or the ability to obtain a license. If you are a detail oriented, motivated self-starter who…
Job Description ATTENTION: BARTENDERS ~ WAITRESSES ~ WAITERS ~ HOSPITALITY ~SALES-MINDED We are looking to fill several full-time positions in entry level sales and marketing. We are specifically looking for individuals that are career focused with an upbeat personality and outstanding people skills. We train and coach our team members with the technical skills they will need to excel in the program. These positions are ideal for someone with experience in the restaurant, bartending, or retail industries! Who are we? We are a rapidly growing marketing firm that specializes in promotions and…
[otp_overlay]