Join Accenture and help transform top organizations and communities around the world. The sheer scale of our capabilities and client engagements and the way we collaborate, operate and deliver value provides an unparalleled opportunity to grow and…
Most people spend up to forty or more hours each week in paid employment. Some exceptions are children, retirees, and people with disabilities; However, within these groups, many will work part-time, volunteer, or work as a homemaker. From the age of 5 or so, many children’s primary role in society(and therefore their ‘job’) is to learn and study as a student.
Granted, there are much scarier forecasts out there, like that University of Oxford study. But on closer examination, those predictions tend to assume that if a job can be automated, it will be fully automated soon—which overestimates both the pace and the completeness of how automation actually gets adopted in the wild. History suggests that the process is much more uneven than that. The ATM, for example, is a textbook example of a machine that was designed to replace human labor. First introduced around 1970, ATMs hit widespread adoption in the late 1990s. Today, there are more than 400,000 ATMs in the US. But, as economist James Bessen has shown, the number of bank tellers actually rose between 2000 and 2010. That’s because even though the average number of tellers per branch fell, ATMs made it cheaper to open branches, so banks opened more of them. True, the Department of Labor does now predict that the number of tellers will decline by 8 percent over the next decade. But that’s 8 percent—not 50 percent. And it’s 45 years after the robot that was supposed to replace them made its debut. (Taking a wider view, Bessen found that of the 271 occupations listed on the 1950 census only one—elevator operator—had been rendered obsolete by automation by 2010.)
“Over the last year interest in cryptocurrency jobs on Indeed has risen strongly. However, in recent months the prices of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have been volatile and (in some cases) declining,” the company said. “Job seeker interest on Indeed for bitcoin and cryptocurrency jobs has fallen, too.”
Summary Creates a welcome environment for Customers. Sells soft drinks, packaged and/or bulk candies, popcorn, hot dogs, ice cream, coffee, and other food items to theatre patrons. Operates and cleans concession and/or restaurant equipment. Cleans,…
That robots, automation, and software can replace people might seem obvious to anyone who’s worked in automotive manufacturing or as a travel agent. But Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s claim is more troubling and controversial. They believe that rapid technological change has been destroying jobs faster than it is creating them, contributing to the stagnation of median income and the growth of inequality in the United States. And, they suspect, something similar is happening in other technologically advanced countries.
In a less anxious world, Pepper might come across as a cute technological novelty. But for many pundits and prognosticators, he’s a sign of something much more grave: the growing obsolescence of human workers. (Images of the doe-eyed Pepper have accompanied numerous articles with variations on the headline “robots are coming for your job.”)
The phrase “don’t quit your day job” is a humorous response to a poor or mediocre performance not up to professional caliber. The phrase implies that the performer is not talented enough in that activity to be able to make a career out of it.
Join Accenture Consulting and youll work alongside fellow industry experts to lead transformational projects and define cutting edge solutions, solving our clients most complex issues. And because our clients span the full range of industries – Including 94 of the Fortune 100 – youll have the opportunity to pursue your passion, hone your expertise and deepen your knowledge. As a Technology Consulting practitioner, youll work with clients to improve the lives of consumers. Youll affect what people purchase, where they shop and what they drive, and have the opportunity to help create a more…
At least since the Industrial Revolution began in the 1700s, improvements in technology have changed the nature of work and destroyed some types of jobs in the process. In 1900, 41 percent of Americans worked in agriculture; by 2000, it was only 2 percent. Likewise, the proportion of Americans employed in manufacturing has dropped from 30 percent in the post–World War II years to around 10 percent today—partly because of increasing automation, especially during the 1980s.
Over the past few years, it has become conventional wisdom that dramatic advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have put us on the path to a jobless future. We are living in the midst of a “second machine age,” to quote the title of the influential book by MIT researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, in which routine work of all kinds—in manufacturing, sales, bookkeeping, food prep—is being automated at a steady clip, and even complex analytical jobs will be superseded before long. A widely cited 2013 study by researchers at the University of Oxford, for instance, found that nearly half of all jobs in the US were at risk of being fully automated over the next 20 years. The endgame, we’re told, is inevitable: The robots are on the march, and human labor is in retreat.
Amsterdam Austin Bangalore Brussels Dublin Düsseldorf Hyderabad London New York Paris San Francisco San Mateo São Paulo Scottsdale Seattle Singapore Stamford Sydney Tokyo Toronto Zürich
Join Accenture and help transform top organizations and communities around the world. The sheer scale of our capabilities and client engagements and the way we collaborate, operate and deliver value provides an unparalleled opportunity to grow and advance. Choose Accenture, and make delivering innovative work part of your extraordinary career. Accenture Operations delivers continuous, rapid fire innovation and new business capabilities that meet and redefinethe needs of the digital era. Youll help our clientsincluding 94 of the Fortune 100 and governments around the worldtransform their…
McAfee points to both retail and transportation as areas where automation is likely to have a major impact. Yet even in those industries, the job-loss numbers are less scary than many headlines suggest. Goldman Sachs just released a report predicting that autonomous cars could ultimately eat away 300,000 driving jobs a year. But that won’t happen, the firm argues, for another 25 years, which is more than enough time for the economy to adapt. A recent study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, meanwhile, predicts that 9 percent of jobs across 21 different countries are under serious threat from automation. That’s a significant number, but not an apocalyptic one.
Still, Katz doesn’t dismiss the notion that there is something different about today’s digital technologies—something that could affect an even broader range of work. The question, he says, is whether economic history will serve as a useful guide. Will the job disruptions caused by technology be temporary as the workforce adapts, or will we see a science-fiction scenario in which automated processes and robots with superhuman skills take over a broad swath of human tasks? Though Katz expects the historical pattern to hold, it is “genuinely a question,” he says. “If technology disrupts enough, who knows what will happen?”
Jump up ^ John Reid Blackwell (March 10, 2011). “SnagAJob gets $27 million investment – Richmond Times Dispatch: Metro-Richmond’s Latest Business & Economic News”. .timesdispatch.com. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
ENGIE Services is a provider of energy efficiency, facility management services and outsourcing solutions for companies and communities. Our experts design, develop and manage tailored, smart and sustainable solutions for our customers benefit from…
For that reason, Leonard says, it is easier to see how robots could work with humans than on their own in many applications. “People and robots working together can happen much more quickly than robots simply replacing humans,” he says. “That’s not going to happen in my lifetime at a massive scale. The semiautonomous taxi will still have a driver.”
Snag is an online employment website specializing in the hourly marketplace.[1] Founded in 2000 with offices in Washington, D.C., Richmond, Virginia, Charleston, South Carolina, and Oakland, California,[2] Snag has been named to Fortune Magazine’s “Great Place to Work” Best Small & Medium Workplaces list for eight consecutive years. Snag has also been named to Washingtonian’s “Great Places to Work” and Deloitte’s “Fast 500”, a ranking of the fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications, life sciences and clean technology companies in North America.[3]
In 2011, Snagajob was named the best small business to work for by the Great Place to Work Institute.[6][7][8] Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell visited Snagajob headquarters the day of the announcement to offer his congratulations.[9]
While such changes can be painful for workers whose skills no longer match the needs of employers, Lawrence Katz, a Harvard economist, says that no historical pattern shows these shifts leading to a net decrease in jobs over an extended period. Katz has done extensive research on how technological advances have affected jobs over the last few centuries—describing, for example, how highly skilled artisans in the mid-19th century were displaced by lower-skilled workers in factories. While it can take decades for workers to acquire the expertise needed for new types of employment, he says, “we never have run out of jobs. There is no long-term trend of eliminating work for people. Over the long term, employment rates are fairly stable. People have always been able to create new jobs. People come up with new things to do.”
Brynjolfsson himself says he’s not ready to conclude that economic progress and employment have diverged for good. “I don’t know whether we can recover, but I hope we can,” he says. But that, he suggests, will depend on recognizing the problem and taking steps such as investing more in the training and education of workers.
Now, it’s possible that some of the productivity slowdown is the result of humans shifting out of factories into service jobs (which have historically been less productive than factory jobs). But even productivity growth in manufacturing, where automation and robotics have been well-established for decades, has been especially paltry of late. “I’m sure there are factories here and there where automation is making a difference,” says Dean Baker, an economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research. “But you can’t see it in the aggregate numbers.”
#Hiring an Administrative Assistant? We have the #interview questions and answers to guide you through the process. http://indeedhi.re/2DlmSBF  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #Recruiters #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/823pt8YXt8
None of this is to say that automation and AI aren’t having an important impact on the economy. But that impact is far more nuanced and limited than the doomsday forecasts suggest. A rigorous study of the impact of robots in manufacturing, agriculture, and utilities across 17 countries, for instance, found that robots did reduce the hours of lower-skilled workers—but they didn’t decrease the total hours worked by humans, and they actually boosted wages. In other words, automation may affect the kind of work humans do, but at the moment, it’s hard to see that it’s leading to a world without work. McAfee, in fact, says of his earlier public statements, “If I had to do it over again, I would put more emphasis on the way technology leads to structural changes in the economy, and less on jobs, jobs, jobs. The central phenomenon is not net job loss. It’s the shift in the kinds of jobs that are available.”
One of the friendlier, more flexible robots meant to work with humans is Rethink’s Baxter. The creation of Rodney Brooks, the company’s founder, Baxter needs minimal training to perform simple tasks like picking up objects and moving them to a box. It’s meant for use in relatively small manufacturing facilities where conventional industrial robots would cost too much and pose too much danger to workers. The idea, says Brooks, is to have the robots take care of dull, repetitive jobs that no one wants to do.
Not everyone agrees with Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s conclusions—particularly the contention that the impact of recent technological change could be different from anything seen before. But it’s hard to ignore their warning that technology is widening the income gap between the tech-savvy and everyone else. And even if the economy is only going through a transition similar to those it’s endured before, it is an extremely painful one for many workers, and that will have to be addressed somehow. Harvard’s Katz has shown that the United States prospered in the early 1900s in part because secondary education became accessible to many people at a time when employment in agriculture was drying up. The result, at least through the 1980s, was an increase in educated workers who found jobs in the industrial sectors, boosting incomes and reducing inequality. Katz’s lesson: painful long-term consequences for the labor force do not follow inevitably from technological changes.
Very great app that actually got me my first job! Indeed makes it very easy to apply. I love that you are notified when an employer views the resume you sent them! This gave me a sense of mind knowing that someone read over my credentials. I got many interviews through this app amd am very happy to …
Multi-Service Heavy Equipment dealership is in need of an experienced Territory Sales Manager to effectively cover 14 county territory and direct the efforts of its Sales force. Qualified Territory Sales Manager should possess an energetic customer first based approach. Looking for a positive leader that has rental and sales experience and Multi-Location Heavy construction equipment dealership responsibility. The Sales Manager must have extensive Heavy Equipment Industry experience and product try product knowledge (Volvo, LeeBoy/Rosco, Sandvik Mining, Heavy Construction and Material handling…
Even our fears about automation and computerization aren’t new; they closely echo the anxieties of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Observers then too were convinced that automation would lead to permanent unemployment. The Ad Hoc Committee on the Triple Revolution—a group of scientists and thinkers concerned about the impact of what was then called cybernation—argued that “the capability of machines is rising more rapidly than the capacity of many human beings to keep pace.” Cybernation “has broken the link between jobs and income, exiling from the economy an ever-­widening pool of men and women,” wrote W. H. Ferry, of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, in 1965. Change “cybernation” to “automation” or “AI,” and all that could have been written today.
Job Alerts make it easy to search for jobs. Have job matches emailed right to you without having to search on your own. Featured Healthcare Jobs Check out our featured health care opportunities Resume Distribution
While many people do hold a full-time occupation, “day job” specifically refers to those who hold the position solely to pay living expenses so they can pursue, through low paying entry work, the job they really want (which may also be during the day). The phrase strongly implies that the day job would be quit, if only the real vocation paid a living wage.
Unmute @Snagajob Mute @Snagajob Follow Follow @Snagajob Following Following @Snagajob Unfollow Unfollow @Snagajob Blocked Blocked @Snagajob Unblock Unblock @Snagajob Pending Pending follow request from @Snagajob Cancel Cancel your follow request to @Snagajob
Despite the labor-saving potential of the robots, Mick Mountz, Kiva’s founder and CEO, says he doubts the machines have put many people out of work or will do so in the future. For one thing, he says, most of Kiva’s customers are e-commerce retailers, some of them growing so rapidly they can’t hire people fast enough. By making distribution operations cheaper and more efficient, the robotic technology has helped many of these retailers survive and even expand. Before founding Kiva, Mountz worked at Webvan, an online grocery delivery company that was one of the 1990s dot-com era’s most infamous flameouts. He likes to show the numbers demonstrating that Webvan was doomed from the start; a $100 order cost the company $120 to ship. Mountz’s point is clear: something as mundane as the cost of materials handling can consign a new business to an early death. Automation can solve that problem.

Job Description Sonder Acquisitions, Inc. is currently hiring Full-Time candidates to join our team as members of our dedicated team of retail sales associates. We are growing rapidly throughout the greater Youngstown area. We need candidates who…
The contention that automation and digital technologies are partly responsible for today’s lack of jobs has obviously touched a raw nerve for many worried about their own employment. But this is only one consequence of what ­Brynjolfsson and McAfee see as a broader trend. The rapid acceleration of technological progress, they say, has greatly widened the gap between economic winners and losers—the income inequalities that many economists have worried about for decades. Digital technologies tend to favor “superstars,” they point out. For example, someone who creates a computer program to automate tax preparation might earn millions or billions of dollars while eliminating the need for countless accountants.
What is the difference between a #JobBoard and a #JobSearch Engine? Learn the differences and why Indeed is a good fit for #employers! http://indeedhi.re/2tH9d8s  #RecruitingTips #RecruitmentAgency #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/2hCdq4dHzn
#Employers – when you post your job with Indeed you get access to free candidate management features! Learn more about our ATS. http://indeedhi.re/2Gk6F2X  #applicanttracking #applicanttrackingsystem #MobileRecruiting #Recruitingpic.twitter.com/ugTRzzOrm2
“The sustained interest in blockchain jobs is perhaps a sign that job seekers believe non-financial companies will pursue blockchain applications, even if financial companies see cryptocurrencies as a fad,” the company writes in the report.
It’s a startling assertion because it threatens the faith that many economists place in technological progress. Brynjolfsson and McAfee still believe that technology boosts productivity and makes societies wealthier, but they think that it can also have a dark side: technological progress is eliminating the need for many types of jobs and leaving the typical worker worse off than before. ­Brynjolfsson can point to a second chart indicating that median income is failing to rise even as the gross domestic product soars. “It’s the great paradox of our era,” he says. “Productivity is at record levels, innovation has never been faster, and yet at the same time, we have a falling median income and we have fewer jobs. People are falling behind because technology is advancing so fast and our skills and organizations aren’t keeping up.”
“We were lucky and steadily rising productivity raised all boats for much of the 20th century,” he says. “Many people, especially economists, jumped to the conclusion that was just the way the world worked. I used to say that if we took care of productivity, everything else would take care of itself; it was the single most important economic statistic. But that’s no longer true.” He adds, “It’s one of the dirty secrets of economics: technology progress does grow the economy and create wealth, but there is no economic law that says everyone will benefit.” In other words, in the race against the machine, some are likely to win while many others lose.
Join Accenture Consulting and youll work alongside fellow industry experts to lead transformational projects and define cutting edge solutions, solving our clients most complex issues. And because our clients span the full range of industries -…
[otp_overlay]