#Hiring an Administrative Assistant? We have the #interview questions and answers to guide you through the process. http://indeedhi.re/2DlmSBF  #RecruitmentTips #HiringTips #RecruitingTips #Recruiters #Recruiterspic.twitter.com/823pt8YXt8
Indeed supports affinity groups to help employees connect over common interests, from tacos to techno music and beyond. We also enjoy local office happy hours and holiday celebrations to keep us connected.
Snagajob is privately held and has raised over $141 million from investors including Adams Street Partners, Baird Venture Partners, C&B Capital, Rho Acceleration, NewSpring Capital, StarVest Partners and August Capital.[11][12][13]
Finally, had a last round call with a Sr. Director, only last about 20 minutes and we just high level recapped the interviews and expectations. Throughout the whole process, the recruiter was amazing and made sure I was informaed and prepared for what to expect and who I was meeting with prior to each interview. He did a great job of covering mine and the companies needs ensuring a great candidate process!
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ENGIE Services is a provider of energy efficiency, facility management services and outsourcing solutions for companies and communities. Our experts design, develop and manage tailored, smart and sustainable solutions for our customers benefit from airports to office parks and industrial sites. ENGIE Services is part of ENGIE in North America, which manages a range of energy businesses in the U.S. and Canada, including electricity generation and cogeneration, natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) distribution and sales, retail energy sales and energy optimization services. ENGIE…
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Summary Creates a welcome environment for Customers. Sells soft drinks, packaged and/or bulk candies, popcorn, hot dogs, ice cream, coffee, and other food items to theatre patrons. Operates and cleans concession and/or restaurant equipment. Cleans, maintains, and stocks the concession stand and/or restaurant. The Concession or Restaurant Worker may also be asked to double as the Box Office Cashier or Usher, as staffing needs require, and, as a result, such an Employee must also be able to perform the essential job functions of those positions. Some locations are equipped for alcohol sales….

Job Description Brand Ambassador – Entry Level / Paid Training *College Grads and Interns Welcome to apply! We are rapidly expanding and in need of FUN and OUTGOING candidates to fill an Entry Level position. Brand Ambassadors will be responsible for representing our clients from with in-store marketing campaigns. Brand Ambassadors will receive paid training on sales, marketing, product knowledge, and customer service techniques. Brand Ambassador Responsibilities Include: – Maintaining client expectations – Retail-based marketing – Quality customer service – Direct sales – Continual product…
If automation were truly remaking the job market, you’d also expect to see a lot of what economists call job churn as people move from company to company and industry to industry after their jobs have been destroyed. But we’re seeing the opposite of that. According to a recent paper by Robert Atkinson and John Wu of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, “Levels of occupational churn in the United States are now at historic lows.” The amount of churn since 2000—an era that saw the mainstreaming of the internet and the advent of AI—has been just 38 percent of the level of churn between 1950 and 2000. And this squares with the statistics on median US job tenure, which has lengthened, not shortened, since 2000. In other words, rather than a period of enormous disruption, this has been one of surprising stability for much of the American workforce. Median job tenure today is actually similar to what it was in the 1950s—the era we think of as the pinnacle of job stability.
“The sustained interest in blockchain jobs is perhaps a sign that job seekers believe non-financial companies will pursue blockchain applications, even if financial companies see cryptocurrencies as a fad,” the company writes in the report.
Alas, the future this study envisions seems to be very far off. To be sure, the fact that fears about automation have been proved false in the past doesn’t mean they will continue to be so in the future, and all of those long-foretold positive feedback loops exponential growth may abruptly kick in someday. But it isn’t easy to see how we’ll get there from here anytime soon, given how little companies are investing in new technology and how slowly the economy is growing. In that sense, the problem we’re facing isn’t that the robots are coming. It’s that they aren’t.
Job Description mmediate openings – we are currently looking to train Promotional Manager Assistants to help oversee campaigns throughout the area and assist with our 2018 expansion goals. This is an entry-level position with the opportunity for marketing management in months, not years. We’re continuing to expand due to our clients demands and market growth. Successful entry level candidate will be responsible for the set up and execution of events with our huge retail venue clients. Clients and products represented vary from Health / Beauty, Home Goods, & Gourmet Food / Beverage. We are…
Job Description ATTENTION: BARTENDERS ~ WAITRESSES ~ WAITERS ~ HOSPITALITY ~SALES-MINDED We are looking to fill several full-time positions in entry level sales and marketing. We are specifically looking for individuals that are career focused with…
Join Accenture Consulting and youll work alongside fellow industry experts to lead transformational projects, define cutting edge solutions, and solve our clients most complex business challenges. And because our clients span the full range of…
Corporate America, for its part, certainly doesn’t seem to believe in the jobless future. If the rewards of automation were as immense as predicted, companies would be pouring money into new technology. But they’re not. Investments in software and IT grew more slowly over the past decade than the previous one. And capital investment, according to Mishel and Bivens, has grown more slowly since 2002 than in any other postwar period. That’s exactly the opposite of what you’d expect in a rapidly automating world. As for gadgets like Pepper, total spending on all robotics in the US was just $11.3 billion last year. That’s about a sixth of what Americans spend every year on their pets.
Indeed’s data science team crunched the numbers to give us the best cities for job seekers to live in, based on job market favorability, average salary, and employers’ scores in work-life balance and job security/advancement. Here are the results:https://indeedhi.re/2Hx4PvW 
Take productivity, which is a measure of how much the economy puts out per hour of human labor. Since automation allows companies to produce more with fewer people, a great wave of automation should drive higher productivity growth. Yet, in reality, productivity gains over the past decade have been, by historical standards, dismally low. Back in the heyday of the US economy, from 1947 to 1973, labor productivity grew at an average pace of nearly 3 percent a year. Since 2007, it has grown at a rate of around 1.2 percent, the slowest pace in any period since World War II. And over the past two years, productivity has grown at a mere 0.6 percent—the very years when anxiety about automation has spiked. That’s simply not what you’d see if efficient robots were replacing inefficient humans en masse. As McAfee puts it, “Low productivity growth does slide in the face of the story we tell about amazing technological progress.”
The contention that automation and digital technologies are partly responsible for today’s lack of jobs has obviously touched a raw nerve for many worried about their own employment. But this is only one consequence of what ­Brynjolfsson and McAfee see as a broader trend. The rapid acceleration of technological progress, they say, has greatly widened the gap between economic winners and losers—the income inequalities that many economists have worried about for decades. Digital technologies tend to favor “superstars,” they point out. For example, someone who creates a computer program to automate tax preparation might earn millions or billions of dollars while eliminating the need for countless accountants.
This used to be a good app. When you were still able to download your indeed resume. then all of a sudden one day after an update. I was no longer able to download my Indeed resume. And I haven’t been able to since. If the creators of this app could make that a feature again. Or a least give the abi…
Anecdotal evidence that digital technologies threaten jobs is, of course, everywhere. Robots and advanced automation have been common in many types of manufacturing for decades. In the United States and China, the world’s manufacturing powerhouses, fewer people work in manufacturing today than in 1997, thanks at least in part to automation. Modern automotive plants, many of which were transformed by industrial robotics in the 1980s, routinely use machines that autonomously weld and paint body parts—tasks that were once handled by humans. Most recently, industrial robots like Rethink Robotics’ Baxter (see “The Blue-Collar Robot,” May/June 2013), more flexible and far cheaper than their predecessors, have been introduced to perform simple jobs for small manufacturers in a variety of sectors. The website of a Silicon Valley startup called Industrial Perception features a video of the robot it has designed for use in warehouses picking up and throwing boxes like a bored elephant. And such sensations as Google’s driverless car suggest what automation might be able to accomplish someday soon.
Flexo label printing company located in southern suburb of Cincinnati wants to hire an experienced flexo operator to run their narrow web label presses. 2nd shift position Monday – Thursday, 4:30 pm to 2:30 am. Duties will be to set up the press,…
Shawn Boyer served as Snagajob’s CEO from the website’s launch in early 2000, to 2013; leading the company from a start-up to national employment network. Boyer was named America’s Small Business Person of the year in 2008 by the Small Business Administration[4] and Virginia Business magazine’s Person of the Year in 2009[5].
The irony of our anxiety about automation is that if the predictions about a robot-dominated future were to come true, a lot of our other economic concerns would vanish. A recent study by Accenture, for instance, suggests that the implementation of AI, broadly defined, could lift annual GDP growth in the US by two points (to 4.6 percent). A growth rate like that would make it easy to deal with the cost of things like Social Security and Medicare and the rising price of health care. It would lead to broader wage growth. And while it would complicate the issue of how to divide the economic pie, it’s always easier to divide a growing pie than a shrinking one.
Brynjolfsson and McAfee are not Luddites. Indeed, they are sometimes accused of being too optimistic about the extent and speed of recent digital advances. Brynjolfsson says they began writing Race Against the Machine, the 2011 book in which they laid out much of their argument, because they wanted to explain the economic benefits of these new technologies (Brynjolfsson spent much of the 1990s sniffing out evidence that information technology was boosting rates of productivity). But it became clear to them that the same technologies making many jobs safer, easier, and more productive were also reducing the demand for many types of human workers.
Job Description Hospitality / Food Industry / Retail / Restaurant – Full Time We are looking for candidates with experience in the retail – hospitality and restaurant / food service industry for the full time account manager position. Do you strive…
That robots, automation, and software can replace people might seem obvious to anyone who’s worked in automotive manufacturing or as a travel agent. But Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s claim is more troubling and controversial. They believe that rapid technological change has been destroying jobs faster than it is creating them, contributing to the stagnation of median income and the growth of inequality in the United States. And, they suspect, something similar is happening in other technologically advanced countries.
No proof that the app works. The layout is nice. Easy to use but i havent herd from a single employer. Not even an email saying that I didnt make the cut. Nothing at all. So i am concerned that the app just doesn’t work. Ive had the app for 4 months used it every day and have yet to even hear from a…
Humanoid robots, to be more precise, which SoftBank describes as “kindly, endearing, and surprising.” Each Pepper is equipped with three multidirectional wheels, an anticollision system, multiple sensors, a pair of arms, and a chest-mounted tablet that allows customers to enter information. Pepper can “express his own emotions” and use a 3-D camera and two HD cameras “to identify movements and recognize the emotions on the faces of his interlocutors.”
Of course, if automation is happening much faster today than it did in the past, then historical statistics about simple machines like the ATM would be of limited use in predicting the future. Ray Kurzweil’s book The Singularity Is Near (which, by the way, came out 12 years ago) describes the moment when a technological society hits the “knee” of an exponential growth curve, setting off an explosion of mutually reinforcing new advances. Conventional wisdom in the tech industry says that’s where we are now—that, as futurist Peter Nowak puts it, “the pace of innovation is accelerating exponentially.” Here again, though, the economic evidence tells a different story. In fact, as a recent paper by Lawrence Mishel and Josh Bivens of the Economic Policy Institute puts it, “automation, broadly defined, has actually been slower over the last 10 years or so.” And lately, the pace of microchip advancement has started to lag behind the schedule dictated by Moore’s law.
Perhaps the most damning piece of evidence, according to Brynjolfsson, is a chart that only an economist could love. In economics, productivity—the amount of economic value created for a given unit of input, such as an hour of labor—is a crucial indicator of growth and wealth creation. It is a measure of progress. On the chart Brynjolfsson likes to show, separate lines represent productivity and total employment in the United States. For years after World War II, the two lines closely tracked each other, with increases in jobs corresponding to increases in productivity. The pattern is clear: as businesses generated more value from their workers, the country as a whole became richer, which fueled more economic activity and created even more jobs. Then, beginning in 2000, the lines diverge; productivity continues to rise robustly, but employment suddenly wilts. By 2011, a significant gap appears between the two lines, showing economic growth with no parallel increase in job creation. Brynjolfsson and McAfee call it the “great decoupling.” And Brynjolfsson says he is confident that technology is behind both the healthy growth in productivity and the weak growth in jobs.
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